WINMAIL.DAT

July 11, 2016 by

So for those of you who are running a Mac and use Apple Mail this might be interesting;

If you ever get an attachment called WINMAIL.DAT it’s because Outlook (or another mail client) is encoding the file with extra text information that Apple doesn’t like.

Its like a sulking competition that’s been going on forever it seems, where neither side is willing to change…

Anyway if you do get it, check your webmail (assuming you a have webmail site) instead of asking the person to resend it in a different way. Your webmail interface generally does not use Apple’s Mail product and doesn’t fail at opening those attachments.

Got WINMAIL.DAT? Goto Webmail. Problem solved.

Either that or use a different Email client on your Mac, but I’m presuming that’s going to be more of a hassle than occasionally checking webmail.

Problems with Chrome on OSX

May 12, 2016 by

I had a problem with a Mac that whenever I tried to run Chrome it would fail. I uninstalled and reinstalled but it would still fail.

The fix was to clear out his Chrome profile located here;

  • ~/Library/Application Support/Google/Chrome

If you don’t care about the plugins/Bookmarks/etc then go ahead and either delete or rename the Chrome folder. If you do then you’ll need to poke about within that folder to save the info you want.

Office files won’t open from a shared drive but DO if copied locally

February 1, 2016 by

Weird would be a good word here…

Anyway long story short (as always) it was caused by corruption in the OFFICE profile – location found below.

Just rename the office folder – of course making sure you don’t have any office apps open at the time.

  • Rename %APPDATA%\Local\Microsoft\Office to something like Office.old.

Open Word (or Excel, etc.) by it’s self (not loading a file) and then close the application.

Then go open that pesky network file and it should fix it.

 

Access denied from browser to router

January 11, 2016 by

Browser denies access to router because security has been tightened on most browsers!

Quick and easy work around is to use Firefox and change the config as below;

Open Firefox and go to the about:config page

  • set security.ssl3.dhe_rsa_aes_128_sha = 0(false)
  • set security.ssl3.dhe_rsa_aes_256_sha = 0(false)

Close the browser and reopen (just to be safe) and you should be fine.

Symantec, the space hog

December 9, 2015 by

If you’ve found this page then you know how much of a pain Symantec Endpoint Protection can be when it comes to eating up space. Server today ran out of space – down to 500mb on the main drive. After clean up it’s back to 71GB… yes you read that right.

So how to clean up Symantec Endpoint Protection’s mess? Simple;

Stop the Symantec Services.
Go to C:\Program Files\Symantec\Symantec Protection Center\db and delete (or if you have space then copy this off somewhere or zip it) the sem5.log.
Start the Symantec Services.

That bad boy just continues to eat up space without regard for the environment. Now I’m assuming that there is some sort of limit you can impose on the log file but honestly I haven’t had time (who does) and so I periodically remote in and run the above steps.

Fixed problem.

VPN’s & DNS riddles

December 9, 2015 by

So you setup a VPN and it works. Well it kinda works. You connect and can ping but you can’t use DNS right? You can’t ping “remoteserver” but you can ping 192.168.1.10.

Simple… just add the VPN’s DNS sever right? Sure that should work… but it doesn’t does it?

Grrr annoyed you add an entry to the hosts file! WTH? Who uses that anymore anyway? But it STILL doesn’t work!

Ahh forget it. They can just remap their drives using an IP address.

-OR-

Here’s how to fix it! Yay. I finally got tired of this issue and spent some time getting it to work. So before I ramble on any longer here’s the fix;

  • Open properties on your VPN connection.
  • Go to the Networking Tab
  • Bring up TCPIP (v4 – for now)
  • Advanced
  • DNS
  • If you haven’t already, then add your VPN’s LAN DNS server in the first field under “DNS server addresses”
  • In the second field you want to append these DNS suffixes
  • Add in here the FQDN or something like mylocaldomain.local (or what ever your local AD domain is)

Worked for me.

DNS changes in DHCP

December 3, 2015 by

This is something that might help for future reference. Something I very rarely have to do but would helpful for other people and a good reference.

Specifically changing where your DHCP client points DNS requests to.

  1. Open DHCP Manager
  2. Drill down to the scope
  3. Open Scope Options
  4. double tap DNS Servers
  5. Add your new shiny server and move it to the top of the list
  6. Click OK and you’re done

Want to turn off Hibernation quickly?

November 16, 2015 by

Open an administrator elevated CMD prompt and then type this;
“powercfg.exe -h off”

Setup a guest network with WAP371

September 10, 2015 by

OK this is going to be a bit of a long one. When I looked around the internet for a guide there was $#@& all so here is how you do it;

  • First you need VLANs. This might be obvious to some but not for all.
  • The default VLAN guest on Cisco stuff is 25, so you may as well just stay with that.
  • First off you need to setup a VLAN on the WAP371.
    • Click on Wireless.
    • Click on Networks.
    • Either choose a Radio for your guest network or setup a new SSID on both/one.
      • For that just click the Add button and name the guest network.
      • Strangely you will then need to tag the network and choose edit. Why it doesn’t go straight into an edit mode I don’t know…
      • Change VLAN from 1 (default) to 25. Give it a name… like Guest, choose your security, blah blah.
      • Click Save
    • So that’s it for your WAP371… now on to your switch/router.
  • I used an SG 200-08P
    • Login to that puppy – default username password is cisco/cisco in case you hadn’t worked that out by now.
    • Click on VLAN Management.
    • It should bring you to a page where there is only 1 VLAN – namely VLAN1 aka Default.
    • Click the Add button.
    • It will popup (turn off your popup blocker if you have one) a page. VLAN ID wants to be…. you guessed it….25.
    • VLAN Name can be anything but let’s stick with Guest for sake of consistency.
    • Now here’s a part that often trips people up. You need to click on Port VLAN Membership.
    • So we want the port that the WAP is connected to but ALSO the router.
      • Say we have the WAP connected to port 2 and the router connected to port 1.
      • Tag the g1 port.
      • Click Edit.
      • Yet another popup.
      • Click on the available 25 but also don’t forget to check the Membership box below.
      • Then you can click on the arrow to add it to the membership.
      • Click Apply.
      • Once it brings you back to the page of ports you should see Membership on port1 now reads 1U and 25T. (the U means untagged and the T means Tagged)
      • Do the same for the g2 port.
    • So that’s that then for the switch. The final part is the router!
  • My router is the RV325. A pretty widely used router for small businesses and one that ticks all the boxes for reliability and function. So far I have no complaints.
    • Again, login to the device.
    • Go to Port Management.
    • Click on VLAN Membership.
    • Now it should have 25 on there already but what you need to do is click Enable right at the top.
    • Click Save.
  • That should be it!

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